Posts Tagged ‘vitamin B12 deficiency’

It’s not pernicious if the patient live

February 28, 2017

To test, I wouldn’t think twice

The abnormal I find ever so nice

And if that’s what they’ve got

I just treat with a shot

Still cheap at thirty times the price.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

 

About twenty years ago I stopped a neurologist in the hospital parking lot for a “curbside consult,” a long-standing tradition. These brief interactions transmit a lot of information.  In the days before the Internet, I realized I needed to know more about vitamin B12 deficiency than I could get from books or journals.

In medical school they taught us not to check B12 levels on anyone under 40. The characteristic findings on the blood smear, they said, with enlarged red cells, anemia, and white cells with too many nuclei, would show before anything neurologic; thus we shouldn’t run the expensive test if the person had a normal blood count.

Time has a way of slaughtering such dogma. I found myself in the middle of a diagnostic series of B12 deficiencies, the most recent at that time a 36-year-old with the classic blood findings. I modified my age criteria and, sure enough, found a very low B12 level, helping to account for symptoms of what otherwise looked like depression with clumsiness.

Before I collared the neurologist, I’d sat down to talk with the hematologist. In the course of 5 minutes I realized he didn’t know much more about the topic than I did.  Approaching the neurologist turned out well.

He said that anything under the lower limit of normal (has gone back and forth between 199 and 287 and has now held steady at 211) clearly shows a problem. Any B12 level over 400 can’t take the blame for a problem.  But the gray zone between 211 and 400 demands judgment.  Anyone with symptoms at or past age 65, he told me, should be treated.  At 35 cents a dose, you can’t justify the expense of further testing.

Since I started this blog in 2010, the price of vitamin B12 has gone from $.35 to $9.00 per dose, justifying further testing in the borderline area. Now when I have suspicions, I check levels of methylmalonic acid and homocysteine, two toxic byproducts that build up in the blood in the absence of adequate vitamin B12 and/or folic acid.

Just about anything neurologic, whether subjective or objective, prompts me to investigate. If someone complains of fatigue, numbness, weakness, depression, erectile dysfunction or trouble concentrating, I go looking.  And the same if the blood smear shows enlarged red cells (an increased MCV or mean corpuscular volume), or even a broadened range of red cell sizes (RDW, or red cell distribution width).

Last week I found 4 new cases of vitamin B12 deficiency on one morning, making me ecstatic to the point of silly. The next day I got elevated homocysteine levels  back on two other patients with borderline B12 levels.

We used to call vitamin B12 deficiency pernicious anemia because the patient always died, and I grew to love the diagnosis because as a frontline doctor I could save the patient’s life for 2 cents a day. Now it costs 30 cents a day.  It still makes me happy.

 

No flu yet, but it’s coming

December 3, 2016

I await the arrival of flu

But still, there’s plenty to do.

There’s joy that is pure

That comes with a cure

Or from following up on a clue.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. A winter in Nome, Alaska, assignments in rural Iowa, a summer with a bike tour in Michigan, and Urgent Care in suburban Pennsylvania stretched into the fall. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, I am back on the job in western Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

 I had a very good clinical week, despite the fact that it didn’t start till Wednesday.

A front line doc like me doesn’t get the chance to save a lot of lives, and when I can do so, especially with a small, inexpensive intervention, it makes my day. My two favorite diagnoses, vitamin B12 deficiency and hypothyroidism, bring a smile to my face and a bounce to my step whenever the lab comes in.

OK, the truth is that I break into a happy dance, and I stay annoyingly cheerful for a couple of days.

I also really like finding a problem I can legitimately treat with antibiotics, and, as time goes on, fewer and fewer people meet the criteria for applying those agents in cases of ear infections, tonsillitis, urinary tract infections, and pneumonia. But this week I saw more than a half-dozen.

A surprising number of people came in with back pain, the problem arising, not in the back, but in the bursa at the point of their hip. I make this diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis easily by pushing on the point of the hip and saying, “Does this give you the same pain that brought you in?” I recommend ice and anti-inflammatory drugs. But I also search for the root cause, which, more than half the time, turns out to be footwear or a change in activity, or both working together.

I drew on my own experience in Adult Children of Alcoholic Parents to help a patient deal with some pretty heavy drama and irony. I established credibility by describing two family members I’d never met as cold, controlling and distant. And I observed that, if a parent dies, the child most distant geographically, also the most distant emotionally, will make the most trouble because they have the most unfinished business.

Three patients came in with fever, aching, and cough, and not one of them came up positive for influenza.

I uncovered the cause of significant liver pathology, only by careful and empathetic questioning.

I examined a toddler with pain and fever and didn’t use force to look in the ears.

At the end of the week, I got into the car as darkness gathered and the snow started to fall.

 

 

Highlights of six weeks in Barrow

March 1, 2011

You might say it flew far like a sparrow

Or fast and straight like an arrow.

     But either way time

     Like a vacation sublime

Went fast while we were in Barrow

Synopsis:  I’m a family practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa.  Avoiding burnout, I’m taking a sabbatical while my one-year non-compete clause winds down, having adventures, visiting family and friends, and working in out-of-the-way places.  Currently I just finished an assignment at the hospital in Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost point in the United States, and I’m in Anchorage for two days.

Six weeks in Barrow, Alaska, has flown by.  We arrived at the end of the two-month Arctic night.  We went out in -75 degree F temperatures, and we stayed inside while the worst blizzard in four years raged outside.

Gone!

Blizzard in Barrow

I worked 360 hours while here, but the other doctors worked more hours than I did.  I received the lightest load on the call schedule.  I didn’t work any nights.

I saw a lot of broken ankles, from snow machine accidents and falls on the ice.  I picked up two cases of vitamin B12 deficiency, nine cases of vitamin D deficiency, two cases of hypothyroidism, and not one case of frostbite. 

I took care of people from all over Alaska, including Barrow.  I also saw those from Tonga, the Philippines, Hawaii, Korea, California, Tennessee, Kentucky, Mexico, Canada, Puerto Rico, Florida, England, South Africa, Colombia, and Ireland.

I met people who had survived plane crashes and gunshot wounds.  I made personal acquaintance with more than a dozen whaling captains, and more than two dozen who had personally killed whales.

A lot of the men had taken polar bears, most at close range with low-powered rifles, many in self-defense.  One had killed a polar bear without a firearm at all.  

I talked to women who sew the seal skins onto umiak frames, and the men who hunted the seals.

When a white-out shut the town down for four days, I suited up and went outside.  Twenty paces from the building I thought better of the venture and turned back.

I didn't have to go out in a blizzard to ice up.

We watched the first dawn after sixty-three days of darkness on the afternoon of January 24, and watched it set less than two hours later.

First sunset and first sunrise in 63 days, at the point. January 23 2011

The medical community viewed the Superbowl in the Commons room, farther north than any other medical staff activity in the country.

I talked to other hunters who shot caribou, wolf, goose, duck, wolverine, seal, and walrus.  Several people had been hunted by polar bears, but lived.

We saw the Northern Lights, I for the first time and Bethany for the second.

We attended Kiviuk, the Messenger Feast that happens every two years.  I saw dancers passionately portray heroic stories with their dances.

Afterwards, while the Northern Lights swept mutely across the sky, we watched the best fireworks display I’ve seen.

While we were here we saw pressure ridges form in the ice on the Arctic Ocean.

For every active drunk I took care of I met two in recovery.

Bethany taught sign, Inupiak, Special Ed, third grade and fifth grade.  She made a lot of new friends, one of whom she started into knitting.  She got a lot of exercise.

I drove twice, a total of less than fifteen miles.

We had the best Kung Pao chicken and Mongolian beef we’ve ever had.

Both of us lost a few pounds.