Posts Tagged ‘CPSBC’

Permit, license, insurance, and a contract with the Queen

October 7, 2018

I ended up feeling so keen

For three things, together they mean

I no longer lurk,

But I can come out to work

After my contract I sign with the Queen.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. I followed 3 years Community Health Center work with a return to traveling and adventures in temporary positions in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska. 2017 brought me adventures in Iowa, Alaska, and northern British Columbia. After a month of part-time in northern Iowa, a new granddaughter, a friend’s funeral, a British Columbia reprise, my 50th High School reunion, and a 4-month assignment in northwest Iowa, I have returned to Canada.  Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

Monday morning I strolled over to the clinic, marveling at my first snowfall of the year.

I had submitted my work permit electronically to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia (CPSBC), which they required before reactivating my license.

I got my new passwords arranged. I’ve done 18 new electronic medical record (EMR) systems in the last 4 years, and, having been away from this one for the summer, I spent the morning practicing.  Mickey Mouse’s name turns up as an imaginary patient in a surprising number of EMRs, including this one.  I entered the diagnosis of felinophobia (fear of cats), and practiced ordering prescriptions, lab, and x-rays. I strolled around the hospital and greeted staffers.

I checked my email every 15 minutes for a reply from the College.

I walked back to the hotel for lunch and a nap. Still unlicensed, I returned to the facility.

By the end of clinic hours boredom set in. One of my colleagues called the College on my behalf.

Tuesday came as a replay. Clicking the REFRESH button every 15 minutes doesn’t count as exercise, and by noon I had started to ache from inactivity.

And I didn’t have cases to talk to my colleagues about. I missed being one of the cool kids who has stuff to talk about.

In the late afternoon my email lit up with notification of license reactivation, but I also had the chance to talk with the College about the possibility getting full licensure, making it return more flexible and shorter assignments possible.

I get my professional liability insurance through the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), based in Ottawa, 2 time zones to the East. So I called them at 6:30 Wednesday morning (8:30 their time), and by 6:35AM I had insurance.

At 8:00AM I strode into the clinic, grinning. In front of witnesses I signed my contract with Her Majesty, the Queen of England, and started into work.

I took care of my first patient of my return before the official start of clinic hours. I got permission to write about the problem, Eustachian tube dysfunction: the pressure in the ears which follows a cold or allergies and for which no effective medication exists. (Insurance rarely covers the only effective treatment, the EarPopper, a device that “pops” the ear, and costs over $300).

PTSD, chronic med refills, adult immunizations, and discussion of complicated endocrine investigations should not come to walk-in clinic. But they did.  At about 10:00AM I had a patient with a true urologic emergency, when I was running and hour late.

The day didn’t get less frantic after that, and I missed lunch.

I vastly preferred the action of the jam-packed day to the boredom that preceded it. And, at the end, I had cases to talk about, just like the cool kids.

 

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Off to British Columbia, Again

October 3, 2018

We drove off in the dark and the rain

Between the fields that yield the grain

And got through Immigration

With work permit summation

And set off for Prince George in a plane

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. I followed 3 years Community Health Center work with a return to traveling and adventures in temporary positions in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska. 2017 brought me adventures in Iowa, Alaska, and northern British Columbia. After a month of part-time in northern Iowa, a new granddaughter, a friend’s funeral, a British Columbia reprise, my 50th High School reunion, I just finished a 4-month assignment in northwest Iowa.  Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission

 

I have restless leg syndrome (RLS), and I met with the neurologist the day before my departure for Canada.

He came to Sioux City during my practice-building years. We hunted pheasants together, watched each other’s kids grow into adulthood, and saw the inexorable spread of gray from the temples.

He got through my complicated visit with a unique blend of humor, warmth, and efficiency. He finished 18 hours before our departure for our next adventure.

It takes more than packing to prep for a 3-month absence from home.

I decommissioned the garden while temperatures dropping to the 40s. I threw away papers procrastinated to uselessness.

In the late afternoon we went to our tax accountant to sign our returns, now swollen stacks of frightening thickness.

Friends met us for a going-away Thai dinner. As the sun set we talked about their kids, the soybean harvest, and upcoming plans.

I started packing a little after 9:00PM. It took me about 90 minutes.

I wrote and rolled into bed after 1:00AM. Bethany didn’t stop taking care of business and didn’t come to bed.  She woke me at 5:00AM.

Dropped in the driving rain at the Omaha airport, laid over in Denver for 3 hours, we landed in Vancouver 15 minutes early.

At Immigration, smiling and exhausted, I handed Canadian Border Services a stack of papers detailing my Labor Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), medical exam, med school diploma, residency certificate, approval by College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia (CPSBC) , membership in the College of Family Practice of Canada, family background, previous contract with the Queen, marriage certificate, etc., etc. Bethany handed over a similarly complicated packet requesting a Spousal Open Work Permit.

Then we sat down to wait.

I knew my packet’s weak link, a current but close-dated LMIA, assuring Border Services that no Canadian wanted my job.

Bethany and I held hands and talked about Where Shall We Go Next, because we came emotionally prepared to be sent back from the border.

But about 4:15PM we got our work permits. I snapped a cell phone picture for the government agency that hired me and immediately contacted CPSBC.

We strolled from the international section of the airport to the Canadian section. We had to show our passports 4 times.

We sat in the departure lounge and chatted with polite, friendly Canadians, many awaiting the same plane to Prince George.