Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

June 25, 2017

They come in, right off the street

The problem it seems, is the feet

And then when the pain

Makes them complain

Orthotics just can’t be beat.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to traveling and adventures in temporary positions. Assignments in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska have followed.  I finished my most recent assignment in Clarinda on May 18.  Right now I’m in northern British Columbia, getting a first-hand look at the Canadian system. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

I have really bad ankles. I started with flat feet as a child, and things haven’t gotten better in the last 60 years.  Now I wear stiff hiking boots with orthotics you can, literally, drive nails with.  They keep me going.

A fair number of my patients, no matter where I go, come in with foot problems.

Most “ingrown” toenails result from people cutting a corner of the big toenail too short, temporarily relieving the pain but setting themselves up for worse problem when the nail grows out, cutting into the flesh. More than half the time the original problem stems from shoes functionally too small.  I tell people to keep their nails trimmed.  With a flair of showmanship I predict I’ll find a hole worn in their shoe lining from the big toenail, then I tell them to file a bevel into the end of the nail, making it both more flexible and easier to trim when it grows out.

Those with plantar fasciitis start the first step of the day OK, then the pain hits. But it gets better as the day wears on.  At the end of the day, they might sit and relax for 20 minutes but when they stand up they face excruciating pain.  I teach them stretching exercises, encourage them to lose weight, and advise new footwear.

Most WalMarts have a Dr. Scholl’s display; those orthotics (shoe inserts) can be the first step away from the pain. But if they don’t work, I recommend the podiatrist, or, sometimes, the orthotist, a person who does nothing but make orthotics.

The patient gave me permission to say that when I told her to take off her shoes and stand up, her arches sagged to the floor. They looked just like mine.

Then I talked about how I felt the first day I put my feet into the solid inserts. I walked away with a gait 30 years younger, my back straighter.

 

Dislocated thumbs and warmth in the ER

June 24, 2017

To the ER the injuries come,

So I just took hold of the thumb

Yes, dislocated

But a technique underrated

Includes no drugs to make the hand numb

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to traveling and adventures in temporary positions. Assignments in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska have followed.  I finished my most recent assignment in Clarinda on May 18.  Right now I’m in northern British Columbia, getting a first-hand look at the Canadian system. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

Over the years I’ve learned at least 8 different ways to put a dislocated shoulder back into place (medicalese: reduce the subluxation).   My favorite remains the one I learned in the parking lot of the hospital on my last day of residency.  I met one of the emergency docs coming in as I was going out for the last time.  He told me he’d learned the technique that involved no drugs, bandages, tape, buckets of sand, or force, and he showed it to me.  I use it to this day.

It failed only once, when in another clinic in another city a very muscular young man suffered a dislocated shoulder in the course of an electrical injury.

Last night, on call, for the first time in my career I faced a patient with a dislocated thumb (the patient gave permission to include a good deal more information than I have). I looked at the x-ray, I reviewed the anatomy, and put together a plan.  But I’d never done one before so I felt I should at least speak with someone with more experience before I tried it.  I put out a call to a consultant orthopedist and I waited.

And I waited.

One of my colleagues who had done several of the procedures, just back from an ambulance run came striding through. I told him the plan, and he gave me the nod.

I had the patient give me the thumbs up sign. I grasped the digit, and we started to chat.  As the patient relaxed, I took the weight of the hand, and, eventually, the arm.  After 5 minutes, supporting the forearm with my other hand, I let go.  Using patience and gravity, the thumb had slid back into place, with no drugs, no violence, and no clunk.

Just the way I like it.

_*_*_*

Injured people rarely come into the ER alone. Some of my patients have problems so difficult to look at that you wouldn’t see them in a horror movie.   The visual impact can jar friends and relatives into free displays of affection.  But during a recent night on call, I witnessed a kiss so astounding that the warmth flooded the ER and so memorable I had to comment on it.  I kept doing what I had to do, thinking all the while that so much love must make a difference in the healing process.

 

A small town is a complex system

June 15, 2017

There are stories, and then there are tales

There are successes, then there are fails

I can say how it went

After the event

But I cannot disclose the details.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to traveling and adventures in temporary positions. Assignments in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska have followed.  I finished my most recent assignment in Clarinda on May 18.  Right now I’m in northern British Columbia, getting a first-hand look at the Canadian system. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

 

I don’t like big cities, I never have. I grew up in Denver, and I can remember thinking at age 8 that city held too many people for my comfort.  After I left home I kept moving to smaller and smaller towns until Bethany and I found ourselves on the Acoma Reservation in New Mexico, in a settlement of about 75, attached to the hospital.  Seeing a stranger would come up as a topic of conversation for a week.

When we moved to Sioux City we found ourselves inside a city limits holding 5 small towns with pockets of wilderness that contained deer, turkey, and mountain lions. The nearest buffalo herd roamed a river bottom 30 miles away, and once a wayward moose wandered through the county.

So I really enjoy this small town. It has a good grocery store and a wonderful recreation center.  Everyone knows everyone.  The first graders walk themselves to school.  Drivers on the highway, like most Canadian drivers, stop to let pedestrians cross.

Wilderness lives hard by civilization here. Enough black bear try to sort through garbage that dumpsters lock, and have signs proclaiming A FED BEAR IS A DEAD BEAR.  I believe the story (though I haven’t verified it) that when the fence around the dump got electrified, 50 grizzlies came into town and had to be relocated.

This town qualifies as a complex system in the mathematical sense of the word: the diverse components connect, interact, and can adapt.  A person could spend an academic career studying complex systems, or even one complex system, but, in brief, everything is connected to everything.  Changing one element changes every other element in a non-linear fashion.

I can’t talk about details of the case, but at the end it involved neighbors, friends, colleagues, and my wife. In many ways a test, with drama and irony it introduced Bethany and me to the community.

The aftereffects still ripple through the social fabric here. People recognize Bethany through a friend of a friend.  People introduce themselves as friends or relatives of those with close involvement.

But the real health impact on the community will come 21 days after the event itself. For some it will bring healing, for others, illness.

When good algorithms fail

June 7, 2017

The thyroid’s a wonderful gland

And if everything goes just as planned

When we get the right number

With good conscience we slumber

But there’s another approach to be scanned.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to traveling and adventures in temporary positions. Assignments in Alaska, rural Iowa, suburban Pennsylvania and western Nebraska have followed.  I finished my most recent assignment in Clarinda on May 18.  Right now I’m in northern British Columbia, getting a first-hand look at the Canadian system. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

I do a lot of lab tests and x-rays, and I interpret results in the human context. Every result pertains to a person in a psycho-social environment, a factor in a complex system where everything is related to everything, and you can’t change one thing without having an effect on everything else.  Thus the popular medical saying, “We don’t treat lab tests, we treat people.”

Hypothyroidism, where the disease stems from an underactive thyroid, a very important H-shaped gland that sits at the base of the front of the neck, stands as an exception to that truism. We treat numbers.  If we get a high thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) value, we give a small dose of levothyroxine, T4, the same as thyroid hormone, escalating the dose by six week intervals until reaching a normal value two tests in a row.

(The higher the TSH, the more the patient needs thyroid replacement; it represents the brain’s plea to the thyroid gland for more hormone.)

The approach works well for more than 95% of the people with hypothyroidism.

The problem arises in that small segment of the population that doesn’t convert levothyroxine (a core with 4 iodines attached) to its more active degradation product, triidothyronine or T3 (the same core but with only 3 iodines). Because each T3 is worth 6 T4s.

I explained all this to a patient two days ago, who gave me permission to write what I have.

Most people with lazy thyroid glands have symptoms that can include fatigue, depression, constipation, aching muscles, cold intolerance, mental slowing, and difficulty losing weight. And the vast majority feel normal when the TSH creeps under 3.5.

But a very few patients still don’t feel right, and microscopic doses of Cytomel (the trade name for T3) can make some, not all, feel much better.

I wouldn’t know about this if my sister’s very good endocrinologist hadn’t inspired me to read further.

The problem arises that such methodology verges on what many mainstream doctors call “fringe medicine,” because of the actions of a very small number of unscrupulous doctors. I try to keep a low profile, and I ran the case by two of my colleagues.  One expressed mild surprise, the other, as it turns out, uses the same approach

 

Reflections on medical frauds

May 8, 2017

The system is inherently flawed

They want me to sign and to nod

They have no excuse

It’s all billing abuse

And I’ll say to their face, “You’re a fraud.”

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

Sunday I visited a web site that promised to cure my tinnitus. It had all the marks of snake-oil fraud: heavy reliance on testimonials, repeated themes that the establishment didn’t want the product to succeed, recounting hard-to-believe medical horror stories for those that relied on established medical practice, and at the end the assertion that the narrator didn’t want to make money, he only wanted to do good for the world but mainstreamers would soon make him take down his website because of jealousy over his success.  Those tools exist because they work, and they nearly worked on me.  I wanted to believe.  But I knew if the narrator really just wanted to help people, he would have made the audio download available for nothing, and relied on contributions to keep the website up.

Towards the end of the video the phone rang. I listened to the robot,  pressed one, and told the live operator, “Your prerecorded announcement said I got the call because I’d responded to a TV back brace commercial.  Is that right?”

“Yeah.”

“How can that be? I don’t have a television.”

The line went dead.

This morning when I dove into my IN box  I found 4 faxes from a physical therapy operation in a nearby town, wanting me to sign off on very general orders for patients that I didn’t know and certainly hadn’t examined. I called the number at the bottom of the sheet, and spoke with a secretary who explained that the firm had a direct access program.  I tried to explain, in turn, that I could not in good conscience sign off on a patient with whom I had had no contact.  But as Mark Twain observed, it is difficult to get people to understand if their jobs depend on them not understanding.  I turned the papers over to our clinic manager.

Yet I also got a similar order sheet for medical supplies, and I checked with the staff; the doc whose place I’m holding indeed orders those supplies yearly, and I signed.

Our country has an enormous amount of medical fraud; vendors interested more in profit than patients buy a lot of late-night TV commercial time, and some people call in to get scooters and other durable medical goods. Over the years I had a lot of requests to sign off on knee, back, elbow and shoulder braces, none were needed.

Yet a few vendors offer diabetic supplies at greatly reduced cost. So I can’t just shred all the requests.  I have to read each one.  After all, the fraudsters only copy successful business models.

 

The thrills of cerumen and B12 deficiency

April 23, 2017

Real flu has cough, fever, and ache

And I know just the pill you can take

And then there’s the test,

It’s good but not best

But a decision it sure helps me make.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

I had a good week in Clarinda.

Orientation on the new job went well; I found it well-organized and well-planned.

The facility not only assigned me a scribe but also a cracker-jack Electronic Medical Record superuser to train me on the 14th new EMR I’ve learned in the last 28 months.

Recognizing the problems of learning a new system, my patients have come no more often than every ½ hour.

Thursday morning went well; I had the immediate gratification of curing the first patient by removing ear wax and the second with osteopathic manipulation.   Close to noon I received lab results on tests ordered earlier in the week, including three vitamin B12 levels.  Two borderline numbers (between 211 and 400) require further testing, and one came in frankly low, less than half the lower limit of normal.  That bit of information made my day; I can save the patient’s life with a simple injection once a week for 12 weeks, then once a month.

Bethany met me for lunch in the hospital cafeteria: well-prepared, healthy food at insanely low prices. I told about how I found my morning not only gratifying but satisfying.

Influenza dominated the afternoon. We have the clinical experience to predict that the annual flu epidemic starts in the north and works its way south, with 90% of the cases in any one location occurring in the course of 3 weeks.  I enjoy taking care of influenza; we have a clear-cut, good but not perfect, lab test and two effective drugs.  The older the patient, the more likely my prescription will prevent death.  Most of my patients here are over the age of 70 with several in their 90s.

The problem with taking care of old people is that I don’t get enough time to talk to them. I could easily spend a morning or afternoon just listening to one patient.  A person can’t get to advanced age without acquiring a large stock of really great stories.

Thanks to a light patient load and a scribe, I finished at 6:00PM. I walked out of the hospital at sunset, ten minutes across dry winter grass and quiet back streets.  We decided to drive back to Sioux City and our own wonderful bed.  We packed the car in less than 20 minutes.  The sky darkened as we traversed two-lane county roads through the rolling hills and farm country. We detoured to Trader Joe’s in Omaha, but missed a turnoff, adding an hour to the trip.

 

 

 

I take call and end up a patient.

April 23, 2017

At the end, it wasn’t a stroke

It was gone when I awoke

The symptoms were brief

Avoiding much grief

And I got to tell a crude joke.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

 

Tuesday evening while on call, I got up to play Scrabble and I couldn’t make my right leg work. It didn’t feel heavy, numb or weak; it felt too light so that any effort to move it got exaggerated.   I sat down to do a neurologic exam on myself.  I found nothing other than my right leg ataxia.  I called Bethany from the next room, and told her the situation.  She helped me dress, and drove me to the ER.

The ARNP covering the ER did the same neuro exam I did, which wasn’t impressive until I demonstrated my gait.

She did all the right tests. The first EKG showed an old heart attack, which disappeared with proper lead placement.

She also found a heart murmur.  It hadn’t been present 5 years ago, but the PA at the VA found it a couple of months ago, and I called her attention to it.

My blood work had no surprises. She offered me the choice of staying in Clarinda or going into Council Bluffs, and I chose to go.  In terms of game theory, if something happened in the middle of the night, I wanted to be close enough for timely intervention.

In the process I had to make arrangements for someone else to take call.

I napped off and on for the ambulance ride, which almost got derailed twice by herds of deer. I bypassed the ER at Jennie Edmundson Hospital.  At 2:00 AM I had gotten settled, my IV had given me a couple of quarts, the second set of labs had come back and I’d had a good visit with the hospitalist ARNP.  Just before being tucked in, I offered the nurses a choice between a clean joke, a clean joke with a bad word, or a dirty joke.  They chose the last option, and I gave them the funniest crude joke in my large arsenal.

I don’t get to tell that joke as a physician, no matter how funny it is. But, as a patient, I can get away with it.  The punch line drew gales of laughter.

By then, motor control of my right leg was functioning at about 90%.

I slept for a couple of hours and had breakfast.

The neurologist arrived, and with economy of motion, did a thorough exam. He advised an aspirin a day and starting a low dose migraine medication.

The morning parade of tests started. By the time Bethany arrived I had done the basic neurologic exam six times and the symptoms had resolved except for the funny feeling inside my head.

I had an ultrasound of my neck, a consultation with the dietician (whom I amazed with my six pieces of fruit a day and my two ounces of salmon at breakfast), a consultation with the Occupational Therapist, and then the Piece de Resistance, the MRI. In between, I napped because I’d slept so lousy.

The hospital feeds its patients on the room service system; I ordered a lunch of soup, sandwich, and fruit, and within a half hour a young Guatemalan arrived with the food. We had a brief conversation in Spanish, I introduced my wife.

And we waited. The hospitalist came back, and went over the results.  Ultrasound demonstrated clean carotids (neck arteries).   The MRI didn’t show anything conclusive.  He also recommended an aspirin a day.

We waited for echocardiogram results. The hospital public address system announced a severe thunderstorm warning, and then a tornado watch in effect till 10PM.  The internet and the TV weather agreed that severe weather approached from the west.  At 4:45PM we decided to leave before the storm arrived, without the echocardiogram results.  We didn’t want to spend the night in the hospital, nor did we want to risk hitting deer on the way back to Clarinda.

Bethany drove. We enjoyed dramatic skies and listened to a Continuing Medical Education CD.  We ate at Clarinda’s premiere restaurant, J Bruner’s, ordering off the appetizer menu.

I returned to work the next day, the episode completely resolved, making it a transient ischemic attack (TIA), also call a reversible ischemic neurologic event (RIND).  Except I noticed my handwriting was much clearer.

I don’t think anyone else noticed.

Have imagination, will catastrophize. Professionally.

April 16, 2017

Here’s a subject in which I’m well-versed,

And for 40 years I’ve been immersed

When it comes to the best

I’ll just keep it in jest.

I’m paid to think of the worst.

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

Some people have a thought process that involves using their imagination to the worst possible effect. They think of all the things that can go wrong, and, sooner or later, they run into health consequences from dwelling on negative things that haven’t happened.  The medical profession has a term for this phenomenon; we call it catastrophizing.   As time goes on, the catastrophizer dreams up more horrible scenarios; they come to my attention when they develop insomnia, depression, and other problems.

I try to point out to the person in question that they couldn’t have anticipated the 10 worst moments of their lives, and that none of last 10,000 terrible “what ifs” they imagined came to pass. Therefore, it follows, that just by dreaming up negative scenarios, they prevented them.  Mostly, they don’t listen.

In the daily course of my work I think about the worst things I can imagine. I’m good at it, I’m a pro.  I have talent, training, and experience.  I can think of really terrible things.

Of course, like the experience of any catastrophizer, most of the really bad things I think of never come to pass. The thought doesn’t quite cancel out the possibility; I run the diagnostic tests.  At the end of the visit I frequently say, “You want me to be wrong.  You want to walk away from the tests shaking your head and complaining about what an alarmist your doctor is.”

A patient (who gave me permission to write this) came in with terrible pain in her hands. I thought of Lyme disease and rheumatoid arthritis, and ordered appropriate tests, but I also examined her med list and decided to at least temporarily remove the most likely candidate, her statin.  A week later, the pain is gone, and she feels better.

I also did not diagnose cancer, Lyme disease, syphilis, B12 deficiency, lead poisoning, measles, sepsis, and meningitis. Despite of string of previous successes, I also failed to find folic acid deficiency and polymyalgia rheumatic.

But I went looking for them. In my case, imagining the scenario doesn’t prevent it.  But, then again, I’m a pro.

 

 

Measles, a word the 7-year-olds haven’t heard

April 9, 2017

Here’s a contagious word to the wise

If there’s rash and runny eyes

With a cough, I suppose

Look! How runny the nose!

And it’s MEASLES! The CDC cries!

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

About 3 weeks ago I received an email from the Iowa Department of Public Health about a case of measles. The person (age and gender not given) had been in the Omaha airport on March 12.  Diagnosis of measles had come on March 15, after visiting 3 different healthcare facilities.

So I was on the lookout for a disease I hadn’t seen for 30 years.

Finishing my Indian Health Service contract in 1987 at the Tuba City, Arizona Indian Health Service Hospital, I saw hundreds of cases, and I had to learn about the disease. Measles discussions center on the 3 c’s: cough, conjunctivitis (runny eyes), and coryza (runny nose); the patient looks sick, and has a fever.  The rash starts on the face, and in the next three days works down the body, concentrating in the midline, armpits, and groin.  The 3-day or German measles has a similar looking rash that also starts on the face and spreads down, but people don’t get nearly as sick.

At the time, that reservation had an immunization rate close to 100%, but when the dust settled, the case count came very close to a 5% vaccine failure rate. Since then, the MMR has gone to a two-dose immunization schedule.

With the alert fresh in my mind, I had reason to think of the things I learned and saw so many decades ago. Working a game of incomplete and imperfect information, I called the state Department of Health.  Connecting eventually with an expert who had never seen the disease, but knew what to order, I heard for the first time of a viral transport medium called M4.  And I learned to use a culturette or a Dacron swan, not cotton and certainly not wood.

We still have no treatment for the disease. And with the illness almost extinct, we probably won’t invent one.  Yet measles still runs into complications in almost 10% of those who have it.

Exposure confers lifelong immunity, and only humans can get measles. Thus as an undergrad in anthropology, in one class we did calculations based on 2 week contagion, 3 week incubation, and generation length of 20 years to figure out how what size population can support the disease.  We decided, eventually, that measles couldn’t be more than 50,000 years old.

Measles remains contagious in the air for 2 hours after a person with an active infection leaves a closed room. Thus the case that triggered the alert, arriving on an airplane, exposed a lot of people.

I want to know about that case. What irony or drama surrounds the circumstances of inadequate vaccination?  Who did the exposing, and how sick did that patient get?  Where was the exposure, and was it linked to the Disneyland outbreak?

I never had measles as a child. The son of a physician, I served as a test patient when I was 14 for the first measles vaccine that only served to deplete what my meager natural immunity.  I had to wait till middle age to get an effective vaccine.

Later that day I asked a 7 year old if he’d ever heard the word, measles. “No,” he said, “What are they?”

The antivax movement makes no sense. Mercury has been removed from the vaccine, and all the evidence linking MMR to autism was fabricated by one researcher who has since owned up to his deception, yet that myth persists.

I fear that the antivaxxers may get enough traction to let the genie back out of the bottle, and that the word, measles, may once again become part of the language.

The blizzard to home

March 1, 2017

There’s the net, and we know what we know,

But if something’s uncertain, it’s snow

Is it foolish or bold,                                       

To make a trip in such cold?

Or just plan on making it slow?

Synopsis: I’m a Family Practitioner from Sioux City, Iowa. In 2010 I danced back from the brink of burnout, and honoring a 1 year non-compete clause, traveled and worked in out-of-the-way places in Alaska, Nebraska, Iowa, and New Zealand. After three years working with a Community Health Center, I went back to adventures in temporary positions until they have an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system I can get along with. Assignments in Nome, Alaska, rural Iowa, and suburban Pennsylvania stretched into fall 2015. Since last winter I’ve worked in Alaska and western Nebraska, and taken time to deal with my wife’s (benign) brain tumor. After a moose hunt in Canada, and short jobs in western Iowa and Alaska, I am working in Clarinda, Iowa. Any identifiable patient information has been included with permission.

I kept an eye on the internet weather predictions on Thursday preparatory to the drive back to Sioux City, and I could see snow predicted for the evening, but the really hard snow wouldn’t start till after midnight. Bethany and I talked about the trip over lunch.  We decided to try to get as far as we could, and, if necessary, stay the night in a motel in Onawa, about 50 miles from home.  We left in light rain mixed with sleet.  Our neighbors called before we reached Omaha.  The blizzard had engulfed our destination.

We talked it over some more. We decided that even if we could get to Onawa, a closed Interstate at that point would mean full motels.

If we’re going to get stuck, we said, we’d rather get stuck in a town with a variety of good restaurants and an overabundance of rooms.

We dined at the Jaipur, and while we tried a couple of dishes we’d never had before, the snow-covered the car to a depth of 3 inches.

We crept down icy streets to a nearby motel.

We hadn’t even brought a change of clothes, but the front desk had toothbrushes with tiny tubes of toothpaste.

We slept hard and deep and awakened rested to find, after breakfast, the car encrusted with ice and coated with heavy, wet snow. The trunk, frozen shut, required a good deal of coaxing to open.

As I pulled onto the Interstate in Omaha, a car intending to take the same ramp from the other direction spun out while I watched.

Between the two of us, my driving talent lies with traffic, and Bethany’s with snow and mountains. I got us out of Omaha and headed north on I-29.  At the first rest area we changed drivers.

On the way to Sioux City we saw two more spin outs and a half-dozen cars off the road, one on its roof.

The drive took twice as long as usual. But we arrived, safe and grateful.

It snowed and it blew but the cold didn’t approach the negative double digits we’d planned on in Fairbanks. Still it’s all part of the adventure.