Medical Advice at Parties.


At parties I’m asked for advice

It’s happened way more than twice

Wouldn’t you know

Sometimes I say ‘no’

But I usually try to be nice.

 

Bethany and I received a surprising number of last-minute invitations to parties today. 

People ask me for medical advice in social situations.  On one occasion, shortly after my mother’s death, I snapped and yielded to the urge to sarcasm and immediately regretted it.  Yes, the request arrived at an inappropriate time and place; no, the patient had never seen me on a formal professional basis; yes, I had every right to turn the request down.  But I did so with finesse and eloquence, a misapplication of good verbal skills.

Today I recommended the book, Love, Medicine, and Miracles in the buffet line, and a trial of over-the-counter meclizine while eating spanokopita.  I listened intently to an alcoholic’s relative, and agreed counseling would be a good idea.  I nodded while a person detailed a coworker’s headaches.

In med school and residency and even later, the docs who mentored me would say, “It comes with the territory.”  I suspect the phrase comes from traveling salesmen who would use it to describe the positive and negative things about working in a particular area.  The advantages of working in Montana differ from those of New York.

I would worry more about seeing a patient as a collection of diseases rather than as a whole human being if I didn’t talk about so many other things with the same set of people.  Today I had discussions about archery, firearms, ballistics, gardening, stone fruit, bicycles, New Zealand, and Alaska.

Yesterday I had a good talk with a friend, just back from 8 weeks of locum tenens (substitute doctoring) in Barrow.  The Inuit filled their quota of 21 bowhead whales; on one day they brought in three.   Weather socked the place in more than once, preventing critically ill patients from reaching services on a timely basis.  We agreed that Barrow ranks as a place on the fringe of the 21st century, that theft was nonexistent, and that the North Slope people smile more than any population we’ve seen.

Bethany and I spent two weeks in June in southern Alaska.  Four days of fishing, four days with friends, and four days of Continuing Medical Education with the Alaska Academy of Family Practice’s 27th Annual Scientific Conference in Kenai.  The sun set about 11:30 and rose a couple of hours later.  Which gave us a lot of time to fish but played havoc with our sleep.  Not nearly as bad as the 8 weeks of unremitting day without a single sunset the first time I went to Barrow. 

I might go back to work in Alaska, eventually, but Barrow remains outside my zone of comfort, like working in Sioux City and having the nearest referral hospital in Dallas.

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2 Responses to “Medical Advice at Parties.”

  1. AussieAlaskan Says:

    Well, interesting again – I was in Fairbanks all of June 🙂 Small world, eh?

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